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May, 2010


May 31, 2010
squash blossom quesadillas

The last time I was at the Mexico City Chapultepec Fair was 20 years ago, with my high school friends. Going back last weekend with my own growing monsters, confirmed that it is not an ordinary Fair experience, ever, regardless of one’s age.

Yes, you find the balloons, with a mix of Mexican and American characters, right at the main entrance.

Continue reading Quesadillas at the Mexico City Fair


May 27, 2010
PoblanoChili1.JPG

The poblano chile is a star in Mexican kitchens. It is used in a wide range of ways and in a wide range of dishes. Some well known examples are chiles en nogada, rajas, pickled, and stuffed with meat or cheese and bathed in a tomato sauce. But there are hundreds of other ways…

Aside from being absolutely gorgeous – chubby, curvy, large, sensuous and with a beautiful dark green color with a bit of a shine to it – it has a striking flavor that is rich, exuberant and fruity. It tends to be a bit capricious as well: it ranges from the very mild to the very hot. However, there are ways to tame its heat.

Continue reading Poblano Chile or Pepper


May 21, 2010
fresh fruits and vegetables Mexican Street Style

Every year, just as summer peeks its warm face in Washington DC, I begin to crave fresh fruits and vegetables Mexican street cart style. One of the times when I have enjoyed it the most was last April.  We were traveling through the Copper Canyon route, on a week long trip, from Chihuahua to Sinaloa. We had been waiting at the station in the town of Creel to catch the Chepe train to go to the next town.

As the station officer let out a scream that the train was approaching, out of the corner of my eye, I saw the fruit and vegetable cart. It was hot, we were tired and thirsty, and I saw Mr. Fruit Cart Man peeling some ripe and juicy mangoes. I grew weak in my knees.

Continue reading Running to Catch the Fresh Fruit Cart!


May 19, 2010

It was a pleasure to talk to Daniel Viotto from CNNEE about Mexican food at the White House State Dinner. A dinner offered by President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama for Mexican President Felipe Calderón and his wife Margarita Zavala, featuring Mexican food. We also covered the increasing appetite for Mexican food in the United States.

Here is the link: http://cnn.com/video/?/video/spanish/2010/05/20/COMjinich.cnn


May 10, 2010
Huauzontle 1-thumb-510x342-1067

Huauzontles, also called Huazontles or Cuazontles, are a native plant to Mexico. Their scientific name is Chenopodium nuttalliae. Huauzontles gave a very thick main stem, oval leaves -that aren’t eaten- and thinner stems filled with edible green flowers that resemble broccoli or rapini, but are much more smaller and delicate.

They have a strong smell when you get close. Similarly as the Epazote, Huauzontles have a deep, clean and almost astringent smell. Some people say they taste similar to spinach or watercress. It seems to me, they have a welcoming and original, light bitter taste.

Though they have been commonly eaten during Lent for centuries, but they are also eaten throughout the year. Since they have become increasingly popular in the US -where they used to be considered a weed- they are now being imported and also grown. They are now available in many Latino and International stores.

Continue reading Huauzontles

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Huauzontles

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May 7, 2010
crab cakes

I was invited to design a Cinco de Mayo menu for Ceiba Restaurant along with their Chef de Cuisine, Alfredo Solis. The invitation included teaching a class covering that menu. As always, I was eager to teach whatever I know. But as always, I learn much more as I go. This time, I also learned, that you never know what foods you are going to like the best.

Continue reading Chef Solis’s Mexican Crab Cakes with Jalapeño Aioli


May 5, 2010
I joined JC to make a cool refreshing Avocado Soup to celebrate Cinco de Mayo. To learn how to make it click below…


May 1, 2010
Mexican Cream 1-thumb-510x342-1727

Mexican cream is rich, thick, tangy and slightly salty. It used to be hard to find in the US, but now you can find it in Latin or International stores, but also mainstream stores! In Mexico, you can find it in any grocery store, and there are richer versions in small towns and ranches, where the cream earns its name “Crema Fresca” and I bet you would feel like me: that you can finish a whole pint in spoonfuls.

If you can’t find it, you can substitute it for other kinds of Latin cream, such as the Salvadoran, they are very similar.

Continue reading Mexican Style Cream


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