Search the website

June, 2013


June 28, 2013

I shared some of my most loved books with PRI’s The World for their Armchair Travel series. And, of course, they all take place in Mexico! Listen in right here…


June 24, 2013

On my recent trip to Mexico, I visited the carnitas capital of the world – Quiroga, Michoacán! So, of course, this time on ABC‘s The Chew, I had to share my perfected recipe for carnitas. I made Carnitas Tacos with Daphne Oz, and we mixed up some Salsa Verde Cruda to top them.

Watch the segment on the Carnitas Tacos…

Watch the segment on the Salsa Verde Cruda…

For the recipe, click here.


June 13, 2013
Hearty Bean and Corn Salad with Cilantro Vinaigrette

One of the things that I’m most enthusiastic about in what I do, is breaking down myths about Mexican food and also about Mexicans. One of the biggest misconceptions is that Mexican food is greasy, fatty, cheesy and overloaded in heavy amounts of condiments. Some of the dishes that crossed the Mexican border and have become popular in the US, have been re-interpreted and promoted by the US fast food industry. Yet, mega burrito bombs, nachos smothered in cheese, and sizzling fajitas with scoops of sour cream on top are things you will have a really hard time finding in Mexico.

One thing that surprises people who delve a bit more into the Mexican culinary world is how crazy we are about salads. Not taco salads, no, no, no… Wholesome salads that use vegetables and beans and grains and flowers and all kinds of dried chiles and herbs…

It may be that the Mexican use of the word salad “ensalada” doesn’t help much to spread this good information because we usually call “ensalada” when there is lettuce or leafy greens in it. This leaves out chayote en vinagre, calabacitas en escacheche (pickled zucchini salad), nopalitos, and a gazillion other salads named simply by their main ingredient.

Continue reading Hearty Bean & Corn Salad with Cilantro Vinaigrette


June 13, 2013
DSC_0586

We’ve all heard that word here and there: “emulsify.” Why do we need to emulsify a vinaigrette? It is simple, emulsify is just a sophisticated word used for saying that you are making ingredients that would not naturally mix together, like water (or vinegar or wine or citrus juice) and oil, come together. And we do want them to come together so that when we add the vinaigrette to a salad or a dish, we’ll be able to taste their combination and not their disparate routes. If you don’t make them mix, you may get one forkful of unappetizing oil-covered greens, and another that tastes overly acidic, making your eyes squint.

To make them mix, or to emulsify, all you need to do is whisk with a fork or whisk or puree in a blender. By mixing fast, the oil breaks into the tiniest of droplets so that it has no choice but to mingle with the other ingredients. However, as it is natural, with the passing of time, the oil will separate again.

In my kitchen, as in most Mexican kitchens, most of my vinaigrettes are oil based. I usually do a ratio of 1 vinegar (or citrus or fruit juice) to 2 or 3 of oil, depending on how acidic my vinegar or juices are and if I am adding other things.

Continue reading Emulsifying an Oil-Based Vinaigrette


June 1, 2013

“The main objective of the Gourmand Awards is to help readers, authors and publishers. We estimate that ten thousand culinary books were published in the world since November 15, 2012.

The Gourmand Awards celebrate the first six months of the year by publishing a list of interesting books from 83 countries. There are approximately 200 food books and 50 books about wine and other beverages. These books are recommended by members of our national juries…”

To continue reading, click here.


Home | About Pati | TV Show | Cookbook | Pati’s Blog | Contact | Terms of Use & Privacy Policy
© 2010-2014 Mexican Table, LLC. All rights reserved.
 
Get the Newsletter