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Chile de Arbol


Green Beans with Peanuts and Chile de Arbol

Green Beans with Peanuts and Chile de Arbol
Ejotes con Cacahuate y Chile de Árbol

Serves: 4 to 6

Ejotes con Cacahuate y Chile de Árbol" alt="Green Beans with Peanuts and Chile de Arbol
Ejotes con Cacahuate y Chile de Árbol" />

Ingredients

1 pound green beans or Chinese long beans, ends removed and diagonally cut into about 2-inch pieces

1 tablespoon soy sauce

1/4 cup chicken broth

1/2 teaspoon brown sugar

1/2 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt

2 tablespoons peanut oil

1/2 cup roasted unsalted peanuts

4 garlic cloves, minced or pressed

3 chiles de árbol, stemmed and thinly sliced

4 to 6 scallions, thinly sliced, light green and white parts only

To Prepare

Bring salted water to a boil, then add the sliced green beans and cook uncovered for 2 to 3 minutes until al dente. Strain beans and set aside.

Combine the soy sauce, chicken broth, sugar and salt and mix well.

Heat the peanut oil over high heat in a large heavy skillet until hot but not smoking. Add the peanuts and fry, stirring constantly, for about 20 seconds (careful, they brown faster than it seems!). Add the garlic, stir, add the chiles de árbol, stir, add the scallions and stir.

Add the green beans to skillet and mix to combine all the ingredients, and finally pour in soy sauce mixture. Let it all cook for 3 to 4 minutes. Serve immediately or turn off the heat and cover to keep warm.

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July 19, 2013
Green beans with peanuts and chile de arbol in Chinese serving dish

Before she died, my maternal grandmother, whom we called Lali (remember I’ve told you about her before?) gave me Gloria Miller’s Thousand Recipe Chinese Cookbook. She was fascinated with Chinese cookery. She was also very good at it. What she loved the most were the stir-fry dishes: fast, tasty and healthy.

So, she bought herself a wok.

I couldn’t begin to count how many wok-made dishes I ate at her house during those long summers I visited her and my grandfather, after they moved to the Californian desert.

After she passed away, that wok found its way into my kitchen. I’ve cherished it. I’ve prized it. I haven’t used it! I’ve dragged it through so many house moves that I’ve also managed to lose its cord. It’s an electric wok. It’s real pretty, too. It’s hers. And in my mind, it is inseparable from her Miller’s cookbook, so I didn’t try to cook “her” Chinese dishes for years. And here and there, I’ve looked for that cord…

Continue reading A Taste of Barrio Chino: Green Beans with Peanuts and Chile de Arbol


April 5, 2012

A couple weeks ago, right as I was setting up for one of my classes, “A Culinary Compass of Mexico,” at the Mexican Cultural Institute, Alberto Roblest came over and asked me a great question.

“Pati, do you cook traditional Mexican recipes OR do you create your own?”

Alberto is doing a project with the support of The Office on Latino Affairs. It is called Hola Cultura and explores the contributions of Latinos to DC life and culture, from art to language to sports to cooking.

I think he meant for me to respond with an either or. He really did. Come on Pati, “traditional” OR “new,” he insisted. But I kept answering “BOTH!” As I kept trying to explain why, I realized so wholeheartedly that both traditional and new not only describe my cooking style but also one of the many wonders of Mexican cuisine.

Continue reading Apple, Radish, Watercress Salad with Pistachio and Chile de Arbol


November 18, 2009
sweet potatoes with orange piloncillo syrup

Our friends Tamara and Sean are crazy foodies and fans of the richness and versatility of chilies. So after receiving the invitation to join them next week for their Thanksgiving feast, I started playing with options on what to bring; with chilies of course.

This is one of the things I came up with and can’t wait for them to try:  creamy and soft sweet potatoes bathed in a buttery orange-piloncillo syrup sprinkled, with toasted chile de arbol. How good are they? That fork in the picture I just shot accounts for my third consecutive serving today. How easy are they to make? Read below…

Continue reading Sweet potatoes with orange-piloncillo syrup and chile de árbol


April 27, 2009

While most of us in DC have stacked our winter clothes up in the attic or inside a trunk, the truth is, it’s still a bit chilly. So today I made this mushroom soup, yet again. I should be tired of it already, since I just cooked 100 portions of it for last Friday’s cooking class at the Institute and I had tested it for weeks… But here I go.. It is just too good!

It is not your typical soup at all. It has the woody and earthy feel of the mushrooms, but their flavor is somehow enhanced by the chile de árbol. It may sound strange, since one would think that chiles mask the flavor of ingredients. But depending on how you use them, they can pronounce rather than overpower other flavors.

Continue reading A comfy soup for the still chilly nights


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