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Coconut


Mixed Melon, Lime & Coconut Aqua Fresca

Mixed Melon, Lime and Coconut Agua Fresca
Agua Fresca de Sandia, Melón, Limón y Coco

Serves: 16

Agua Fresca de Sandia, Melón, Limón y Coco" alt="Mixed Melon, Lime and Coconut Agua Fresca
Agua Fresca de Sandia, Melón, Limón y Coco" />

Ingredients

12 cups cubed, seeded watermelon (about 1 8-pound watermelon)

4 cups cubed cantaloupe

2 cups coconut water

1/3 cup honey

1/2 cup freshly squeezed lime juice (about 6 limes juiced)

1 liter seltzer water

Lime slices, to garnish

Mint leaves, to garnish

To Prepare

Working in batches, combine the watermelon, cantaloupe, coconut water, honey and lime juice in a blender. Pulse until well pureed. If desired, pass the mixture through a fine-mesh strainer. Refrigerate in a large punch bowl until well chilled, about 2 hours.

Serve with a splash of seltzer and garnish with lime slices and mint leaves.

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http://www.patismexicantable.com/2014/01/mixed-melon-lime-and-coconut-agua-fresca/


AVOCADO AND COCONUT ICE CREAM
Helado de Aguacate y Coco
Serves 6

INGREDIENTS
3 large ripe Hass avocados, about 2 pounds, halved, pitted, pulp scooped out (about 3 cups)
2 tbsp fresh squeezed lime juice
1 1/2 cups coconut milk
3/4 cups sugar, more to taste
1/4 cup dried shredded coconut, lightly toasted, optional for garnish, or toasted almonds, pine nuts or pistachios

TO PREPARE
Cut the avocados in half, remove the pit and scoop the pulp out. Cut the pulp into chunks and place it in the blender or food processor. Add the coconut milk, sugar, and lime juice, and puree until smooth.

Process the avocado-coconut puree in you ice cream maker, or ice cream ball, according to the manufacturers instructions. Place in the freezer for a couple hours for firmer ice cream. If you don’t have an ice cream maker you can serve it as a cold mousse, or you can also freeze it and serve it as ice cream, but it will be a little less fluffy. But its still good!

Lightly toast the shredded coconut on a small saute pan set over medium-low heat, stirring constantly so it does not burn. It will take less than a minute. Once the coconut becomes fragrant and acquires a tan, remove and set aside. Sprinkle over the ice cream.


November 27, 2009
coconut flan

I do love the change of seasons in the Eastern United States. The fall leaves change to different shades and make fluffy mountains where the boys jump a thousand times in a single day. I also like the smell of winter winds waiting around the corner as our home heating starts to warm up. And I have so much fun getting all of us coats and hats and gloves, something I never did growing up.

But I do miss my piece of beachside coconut flan. The one I used to have in Acapulco, many Decembers ago, growing up. My favorite was from Pipo’s, a restaurant in “la Costera”, an old neighborhood along the beach. It has a creamy and smooth layer on top that blends into a bottom layer of softened and nicely chewy coconut. I have tried a couple versions and the best one is also the simplest one.

Continue reading Beachside coconut flan


September 17, 2009


“Petite, energetic and possibly the most exuberant female chef in town, Mexican-born Patricia Jinich runs the culinary programs for the Mexican Cultural Institute, and with her contagious enthusiasm for Mexican culture and food, has attracted countless visitors to the landmark building on upper 16th Street”

To continue reading (and for recipe on coconut flan) click here

examiner.jpg
(Photo by Andrew Harnik for the Examiner)



July 10, 2009

No matter how hard we tried we just couldn’t stay dry.

A single step out of the plane and it all seemed part of a magical realism novel from Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez. In that hot, humid and tropical pueblo, every move was slowed down in a permanent mist, which made my clothes feel damp. Under the open sunny sky, that mist was shiny and full of light as it transformed the colors from the exotic overgrown plants, colorful houses and small streets. There were cute little insects, bees and hummingbirds moving all around. Wide chubby trees offered some shade, as people walked by with no hurry, wearing earth colored hats.

And everything, absolutely everything, was infused with the lusciously sweet aroma of vanilla.

No. I don’t do drugs.

This is a true description of a small town in the region of Totonacapan in the state of Veracruz, where vanilla originated and is still heavily grown. Also where my husband and I were invited to a wedding, more than a decade ago. And it was in that small pueblo, where I tasted the best horchata I have ever tried.

Continue reading We could all use a little Horchata…


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