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Holiday


December 6, 2014

“In the convents around Mexico during the colonial era, the nuns became serious cooks, says Pati Jinich, author of ‘Pati’s Mexican Table’ and host of the PBS series of the same name. The church was a major power, and it was in the kitchens of the convents where traditional Spanish recipes started to take in local ingredients; many Mexican classics like mole poblano and chiles en nogada supposedly came from the convents.

Rompope reportedly was invented in the convent of Santa Clara, in Puebla. ‘Puebla is known as the city of sweets,’ Jinich says, and the nuns had a reputation for ‘an incredible sweet tooth. . . . They brought all the Spanish recipes, the flans and the sweets made with almonds . . . and started mixing the Spanish recipes that were heavy on the sugar and milk — which was very uncommon for Mexico — with Mexican ingredients’…”

To read the entire article, click here.


November 23, 2013

Listen in as I talk with Lynne Rossetto Kasper about my Mexican Thanksgiving turkey, as part of The Splendid Table‘s special “Swanksgiving” episode…

For the recipe, click here.


November 21, 2013

“There’s a little turkey at Eight Mile Creek Farm in upstate New York who will soon sacrifice her life for our Thanksgiving meal. We’ve named her Patita, after our good friend Pati Jinich, a brilliant and effervescent Mexican cook, television show host, and cookbook author. It’s Pati’s recipe for Mexican Turkey that we will use to honor the life of the bird who will grace our table as we give deep thanks for everything we have and everything we’re able to share with our friends this year.

This recipe leaves the turkey with wonderful depth, without being overly complicated. By roasting the bird on top of a layer of onions and tomatoes, the meat takes on a ton of flavor, and what remains transforms into a rich, Mexican-influenced gravy…”

To read the entire article, click here.


September 11, 2013
Gefilte Fish a la Veracruzana

My paternal grand mother, Bobe, used to make two kinds of gefilte fish every Friday: white or traditional and red or a la Veracruzana. The moment you sat down, she made you choose, “which do you want mamele, white or red?”

Invariably, after you chose, she’d ask, “you don’t like the way I make the other one?”

She’d barge in, make room on your plate and serve you the kind you hadn’t picked, right next to the one you had chosen. She’d wait for you to taste it and tell her how good the one you hadn’t chosen was. Then, she would eat right off your plate.

Having come from tiny shtetls in the polish countryside, both her and my grandfather arrived in Mexico so very young. Mexico gave them an opportunity to start a life away from pogroms.

They worked hard and made a simple but good life for themselves. Though they were humble, and without much savings, every Friday they had a bountiful table full of food for their three grown children and their families – all together there were ten granddaughters. Nope. Not a single grandson!

Continue reading Do You Want it Red or White? Mexican Style Gefilte Fish


July 16, 2013

20 DECEMBER 2013
12:00 PM to 2:00 PM

I will be talking about travel to Mexico and Mexican holiday traditions at the Bethesda Farm Women’s Market in Maryland this Fall. And, of course, will sign your copies of my cookbook! I hope you will consider joining me.

For more information, click here.


May 1, 2013

“Well, it’s probably a little uncharitable to call it a fake holiday, because Cinco de Mayo does celebrate something very real — namely liberation from the French (haw haw) during the Battle of Puebla in 1862. Although it’s not celebrated in any big way in Mexico, it’s a huge part of Mexican-American culture. And what better way to flip a bird at the French than to make some really good Mexican food?

So we teamed up with Pati Jinich, the official chef of the Mexican Cultural Institute in Washington, D.C. and author of Pati’s Mexican Table, to get some invaluable advice on how to cook authentic Mexican food at home…”

To read the entire article, click here.


February 21, 2013

5 DECEMBER 2013
6:30 PM to 9:00 PM

Cooking demonstration and tasting dinner at the Mexican Cultural Institute.

Mexico’s holiday tradition is much more than a piñata and poinsettias—join me as I show some of Mexico’s most classic holiday offerings. Bacalao a la Vizcaina, Mexican Style Fruit Punch, Tamales and Festive Sweets take center stage for a delicious and wide-ranging exploration of Mexican holiday culture.

To register and for more information, click here.


November 14, 2012

I hadn’t heard about Thanksgiving until I moved to Texas. Yet, I took my first shot at cooking the meal that cold fall of 1997 in the vast yellow plains of Dallas. Inspired by the glossy food magazines, cookbooks and TV shows, and wanting to immerse myself in the American experience, I baked, cooked and stirred while feeling homesick for my family’s home-cooking. It took years of living in the US for me to grasp the depth and warmth of the holiday and the menu, many failed turkeys and side dishes along the way.

It turns out, fifteen years later, the Thanksgiving feast has become such a relevant part of our lives that if we ever moved back to Mexico, I’d have to bring it back with us.

The connection wasn’t instantaneous. Slowly, some elements began to resonate within me. Take the bird: Turkey is an indigenous ingredient in Mexican cookery and a center piece for Christmas and the New Year. Both are holidays which also happen near the end of the year, during the coldest season, and have to do with gathering family and friends around a plentiful table. And being thankful. And hopeful.

Continue reading Sweet Potato Rounds with a Punch


October 25, 2012

I wouldn’t be caught dead without Pan de Muerto during Day of the Dead.

One of the most meaningful, colorful and delicious of Mexican celebrations, Dí­a de Muertos has this bread as one of its trademark treats. It may sound strange to eat fluffy sugared up bread in the shape of bones, but then again, we also eat calaveritas, candies in the shape of skulls. This shows how crucial food is for Mexicans but also how it gets infused with our sarcastic sense of humor, generous spirit and gutsy attitude.

Not that Day of the Dead is such a big occasion here in the United States, but I notice an increased awareness. Teachers are starting to talk about it in schools, sugar skulls and decorations are popping up in stores…It’s becoming trendy. As it happens right on the tail of Halloween, elements from both celebrations seem to cross paths. They both include graveyards and a lot of eating, but they are quite different.

Day of the Dead, which is not one but two days, November 1st and 2nd, is when those departed have a license to come back and visit the ones they’ve left behind. And hey, if they are coming back from another world, it better be a feast worth the trip! Altars are decorated, filled with the visitor’s favorite foods and drinks, candles and flowers placed throughout, to help illuminate for a safe journey back home. There are visits to the cemetery, too, but of a different nature than Halloween: Day of the Dead is a bittersweet, sad and joyous time for gathering, feasting and remembering.

Pan de Muerto, has to be one of the sweetest sides of it, eagerly awaited by all.

Continue reading Make Pan de Muerto at Home!


December 21, 2011

“From the Feast of Seven Fishes on Christmas Eve to Barbecue on Fourth of July — we’re talking holiday food traditions familiar and obscure.”

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