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September 11, 2013
Gefilte Fish a la Veracruzana

My paternal grand mother, Bobe, used to make two kinds of gefilte fish every Friday: white or traditional and red or a la Veracruzana. The moment you sat down, she made you choose, “which do you want mamele, white or red?”

Invariably, after you chose, she’d ask, “you don’t like the way I make the other one?”

She’d barge in, make room on your plate and serve you the kind you hadn’t picked, right next to the one you had chosen. She’d wait for you to taste it and tell her how good the one you hadn’t chosen was. Then, she would eat right off your plate.

Having come from tiny shtetls in the polish countryside, both her and my grandfather arrived in Mexico so very young. Mexico gave them an opportunity to start a life away from pogroms.

They worked hard and made a simple but good life for themselves. Though they were humble, and without much savings, every Friday they had a bountiful table full of food for their three grown children and their families – all together there were ten granddaughters. Nope. Not a single grandson!

Continue reading Do You Want it Red or White? Mexican Style Gefilte Fish


March 20, 2013

“Passover celebrates the Hebrews’ flight from Egypt to freedom more than 3,000 years ago. Jews around the world will remember that exodus at sundown March 25 with a ritual dinner, or Seder. And what’s on the table will tell a story of its own, one based on faith, tradition and family.

Pati Jinich will gather her husband and three sons at their home in Drummond, Md., for a meal that reflects their story as Mexican Jews, a tiny religious minority, an estimated 40,000 people, in a country that is overwhelmingly Christian.

‘I was one of three Jews in a class of 120 kids,’ Jinich recalls in an email. But since her family was not very involved in Mexico City’s Jewish community, she felt ‘sort of not from here and not from there’…”

To read the entire article, click here.


March 13, 2013

I had so much fun being a part of the Mexican Fiesta on ABC‘s The Chew! I cooked a hearty Aztec Chicken Casserole with Mario Batali and followed it up with my Spinning Top cocktail to “get you drunk or dizzily in love.”

Watch the segment on the Aztec Casserole…

Watch the segment on the Spinning Top…

For the Aztec Chicken Casserole recipe, click here.
For the Spinning Top recipe, click here.


March 8, 2013

During a stop in my first home state in the U.S. (Texas!), I showed Great Day SA host Bridget Smith how to make one of my family’s favorites Chicken Tinga. If you weren’t able to watch me on KENS 5, view the video here…

 


March 5, 2013

“In Pati’s Mexican Table, the first cookbook from Pati Jinich, Jinich is not looking for culinary tourists but converts. Host of the public television series of the same name and official chef of the Mexican Cultural Institute based in Washington, DC, Jinich shares her passion for the Mexican home-style cooking she grew up with in Mexico City…”

To read the entire review, click here.


February 14, 2012

“Every few months, my family gets together with a Latin group of friends and their families for a potluck.

This winter it was our turn. As tradition goes, the host brings the main dishes to the table and the others bring the rest. I eagerly announced my plans to share Mexican casseroles, also called cazuelas, budines or pasteles. The Mexicans couldn’t hide their joy — ‘Pati! De veras? Budin Azteca? Cazuela de Tamal?!’ — and quickly thought of other ‘very’ Mexican sides to pair with them. The Argentines and Costa Ricans tried to understand what ‘Mexican casserole’ meant and whether it was supposed to be any good…”

To read the entire article, click here.


If you’re fighting a war, how do you cook food on the run? What sort of meals can you make around ranches, porches, and rustic bonfires? What might Pancho Villa or Emiliano Zapata have eaten? This episode looks at the culinary legacy of the Mexican Revolution, with recipes that include:


November 4, 2009

“You know how some people become attached to a certain dish? They try it somewhere once and then want to go back to eat it again and again, or they make it at home repeatedly in an until-death-do-us-part kind of vow? Well, I am one of those people, and I have made that vow with quite a few dishes from the Mexican state of Michoacan.

It surprises me how Michoacan’s cuisine has remained such a well-kept secret. It has a defined personality and a complex layering of delicious flavors like the more popular cuisines from Oaxaca and Puebla, but its dishes seem to be a bit more comforting and use fewer ingredients…”

To read the entire article, click here.


July 22, 2009

“Growing up in Mexico City, my sisters and I used to prepare exotic meals, perfumes and potions for the inhabitants of our enchanted forest. That was our dog, the bluebird, snails, butterflies and ladybugs that happened to peek into our backyard and witness our extravagant mess. It also included any family friend who happened to stop by and become a willing victim. We sometimes offered cooking classes, too.

My mother set us up in the backyard on a big blanket with random pots and pans, while she cooked laborious weekend meals. There was a fig tree, an apple tree, a peach tree, a couple of what we called Chinese orange trees, and tons of azaleas and herbs that offered an immense array of witchcrafting material. But among our most prized ingredients were dried jamaica (pronounced ha-may-kah) flowers, known in the U.S. as hibiscus flowers, stored in a big jar in the kitchen…”

To read the entire article, click here.


March 26, 2009

Talking about American foods enriched by Mexican ingredients, I can’t leave out those tasty, juicy and smoky Ancho Chile hamburgers. My mother used to make them for our birthday parties as me and my sisters grew into teenagers. We felt more hip having funky burgers instead of kid sized tacos. Plus, they were a hit with our friends.

They are a snap to make and for the Mexican spin you just need to prepare a seasoning paste with Ancho Chiles.  Anchos, being ultra mild and somewhat fruity with a hint of prunes, make an instant click with the meat.

Continue reading Tex Mex or Mex Tex: Take Two


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