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Pasilla Chile


Fish with Plums Pasilla and Tequilla

Tilapia with Plums, Pasilla and Tequila
Huachinango con Salsa de Ciruela, Pasilla y Tequila

Serves: 6

Huachinango con Salsa de Ciruela, Pasilla y Tequila" alt="Tilapia with Plums, Pasilla and Tequila
Huachinango con Salsa de Ciruela, Pasilla y Tequila" />

Ingredients

2 tablespoons vegetable oil, plus 2 more for cooking the fish

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

1 1/2 cups slivered white onion

3 pressed or minced garlic cloves

4 ripe plums, halved, pitted, sliced

4 to 6 pasilla chiles, stemmed, seeded, sliced

1/4 teaspoon brown sugar, or to taste

3/4 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt, or to taste, plus more to season the fish

2 tablespoons silver tequila

1/4 cup freshly squeezed orange juice

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

6 red snapper fillets, skin on (about 6 ounces) or another flaky and mild tasting fish of your choice such as tilapia, rock fish, or grouper

To Prepare

Heat the oil and butter in a large heavy skillet set over medium heat. Once the butter melts and begins to sizzle, before it browns, add the onion. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes, until it softens and begins to gently brown around the edges. Add the garlic, mix well and cook for another minute. Toss in the sliced plums and chiles, sprinkle in the sugar and salt, stir, and cook for about 6 to 7 minutes. The plums should be cooked and gently browned and the chiles softened.

Pour in the tequila, gently tilt towards the fire to ignite it, cook until flames disappear. Add the orange juice, stir, and cook for a couple minutes more. Set aside.

Heat a couple tablespoons oil in a large heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Season the fish with a sprinkle of salt and freshly ground pepper. Sear the fish, skin side down first, for 2 to 3 minutes, until skin has crisped and browned. Flip the fish to the other side and cook until desired doneness, my choice is 2 to 3 minutes more.

Serve with a generous spoonfull of the chunky plum sauce on top.

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http://www.patismexicantable.com/2015/03/fish-with-plums-pasilla-and-tequila-2/


December 3, 2010

When I think about my mother, I think about her fava bean soup (fine, and a couple other things too…). That’s how strong an impact that soup has had on me.

But not many people are wild about favas, habas in Spanish. Different from pasta or potatoes, Favas haven’t gone mainstream.

Okay. I can see why.

First, the fact that they come in many forms can be confusing (fresh in their pod, fresh out of the pod, dried with their skin on, or dried and peeled). Also, the ways to cook them in their different forms haven’t been widely publicized. On top of that, favas have a strong flavor that can be overpowering, and to some, hard to bear.

Now, bear with me here. If you know what form of favas to get for which kind of dish, the confusion is almost gone. With the right recipe, the confusion evaporates further and their overpowering flavor is tamed. Thus… beloved cooks, favas become what they must:
filling, rich, wholesome and deliciously intense.

Continue reading Fava Bean Soup: Time to go Mainstream!


October 1, 2010

This is by far, the best brisket I’ve ever had.

The meat chunks gain a nutty brown crust as they cook, yet as you take a bite they fall apart in your mouth. And the sauce, thick, a bit tart, a bit spicy and wholeheartedly rich, enhances the flavor of the meat. It is a dish with a flavor hard to forget: it has loads of personality.

It’s become the trump card I pull out for guests that love unusual and authentic flavors from Mexico. The best part of it is, the hardest part about making it, is waiting for the brisket to cook on its own.

I first tried a version of it in Santa Fé de la Laguna, Michoacán. A popular dish in that region, it goes by the name of Carne Enchilada. A young and knowledgeable Purépecha cook, Berenice Flores, showed me how to make it at her home. When my whole family sat down to eat it, we kept asking her for more corn tortillas to wipe the sauce clean off the plates.

Continue reading Brisket in Pasilla Chile and Tomatillo Sauce


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