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Salad


Grilled Romaine and Red Bell Peppers with Ancho Chili Vinaigrette & Cheese

Grilled Romaine and Red Bell Peppers with Ancho Chile Vinaigrette and Cheese
Ensalada de Lechuga y Pimientos Asados con Vinagreta de Chile Ancho y Queso

Serves: 6

Ensalada de Lechuga y Pimientos Asados con Vinagreta de Chile Ancho y Queso" alt="Grilled Romaine and Red Bell Peppers with Ancho Chile Vinaigrette and Cheese
Ensalada de Lechuga y Pimientos Asados con Vinagreta de Chile Ancho y Queso" />

Ingredients

For the vinaigrette:

6 to 8 ancho chiles (about 3 ounces), rinsed, stemmed and seeded

1/2 cup finely chopped white onion

1 clove garlic, finely chopped

1/4 cup unseasoned rice vinegar

1/4 cup distilled white vinegar

1/2 cup vegetable oil

1 1/2 teaspoons kosher or coarse sea salt, or to taste

2 teaspoons brown sugar or grated piloncillo, or to taste


For the salad:

3 red bell peppers

3 heads romaine lettuce

Olive oil, to drizzle

1/2 cup crumbled queso fresco, mild feta or farmers’ cheese

To Prepare

To make the vinaigrette: Using kitchen scissors or a sharp knife, cut the stemmed and seeded chiles lengthwise into thin strips and place them in a mixing bowl. Add the onion, garlic, vinegars, oil, salt and sugar to the bowl and toss to mix well. Transfer everything to a container with a tight-fitting lid and refrigerate for at least 8 hours before using.

To make the salad: Place the red bell peppers either on a tray under the broiler, on a heated grill, or on a heated comal on the stovetop, and char on all sides, flipping as each side chars, about 10 minutes. Remove from the heat. Once cool enough to handle, remove the stems and cut into slices (without removing the skin or discarding the juices).

Slice the romaine lettuces in half lengthwise. Drizzle each half with a small amount of olive oil and sprinkle on a pinch of salt and pepper. Place them on a heated grill or comal and quickly char, about 1 minute per side.

Serve lettuces on a platter along with the red bell pepper strips, ladle the ancho chile vinaigrette on top and sprinkle with the cheese.

© 2010-2014 MEXICAN TABLE, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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Fish over Fennel Salad with a Jalapeno and Olive Salsa

Fish over Fennel Salad with Jalapeño and Olive Salsa
Pescado con Ensalada de Eneldo y Salsa de Jalapeño y Aceitunas

Serves: 4

Pescado con Ensalada de Eneldo y Salsa de Jalapeño y Aceitunas" alt="Fish over Fennel Salad with Jalapeño and Olive Salsa
Pescado con Ensalada de Eneldo y Salsa de Jalapeño y Aceitunas" />

Ingredients

For the fennel salad:

2 tablespoons pumpkin seeds

1 fennel bulb, thinly sliced

1/4 cup thinly sliced red onion (about 1/4 of a red onion)

2 oranges, peeled and thinly sliced or cut into segments, plus juice

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

Kosher or coarse sea salt, to taste

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste


For the olive salsa:

1/4 cup golden raisins

1 tablespoon tequila

1/4 cup chopped pitted black Italian olives in brine

1 jalapeño chile, thinly sliced

1/4 cup fresh cilantro, leaves and upper stems, chopped

1/4 cup fresh parsley, leaves and upper stems, chopped

Freshly squeezed juice of 2 limes

2 tablespoons olive oil

Kosher or coarse sea salt, to taste

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste


For the fish:

1/2 cup all-purpose flour

Kosher or coarse sea salt, to taste

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

4 6-ounce red snapper fillets, or any mild fish of your choice, such as tilapia, rockfish or grouper

3 tablespoons olive oil

To Prepare

To prepare the salad: To toast the pumpkin seeds, place them in an already hot, small sauté pan set over low heat. Stir often, being careful that they don’t burn, until you start to hear popping sounds (similar to popcorn), and they begin to turn from green to a toasty brown, about 4 to 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and place in a bowl.

Combine fennel, red onion, orange segments and juice in a mixing bowl. Add the olive oil, balsamic vinegar, salt and pepper. Toss to combine. Add the toasted pumpkin seeds. Toss once more and wait to serve with the fish.

To prepare the salsa: Place the golden raisins in a medium mixing bowl and pour the tequila over the raisins. Allow the raisins to plump up in the tequila for a few minutes while prepping the remaining ingredients. Then add the olives, jalapeño, cilantro, parsley, lime juice, olive oil, salt and pepper to the bowl with the raisins and tequila. Combine well and serve with the fish.

To prepare the fish: Combine the flour, a pinch salt and a pinch pepper on a flat plate and spread. Using a small knife, score each fish filet, cutting 3 shallow horizontal lines into the skin of each fillet – do not cut through the fillets. Dust the fillets on each side with a thin layer of the flour mixture.

Heat the oil in a skillet over medium heat. When oil is hot and ready (test by dipping a piece of the fish to see if it happily bubbles), place the fillets in the pan skin-side down. Cook until the skin is crisped and lightly browned, about 3 minutes. If at any point the fish begins to curl, use a spatula to press the fish firmly down in the pan. Flip with a spatula or tongs and cook on the other side until done, about another 4 minutes. Transfer the fish to a plate covered in paper towels to drain. Serve on top of the fennel salad and with the salsa on the side.

© 2010-2014 MEXICAN TABLE, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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Crab, Cucumber & Jicama Salad

Crab, Cucumber and Jícama Salad
Ensalada de Cangrejo, Pepino y Jícama

Serves: 4

Ensalada de Cangrejo, Pepino y Jícama " alt="Crab, Cucumber and Jícama Salad
Ensalada de Cangrejo, Pepino y Jícama " />

Ingredients

6 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice

Zest of 2 limes

1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste

3 tablespoons rice wine vinegar

1 tablespoon honey

3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

Kosher or coarse sea salt, to taste

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

1 small jícama, peeled and julienned

1 large English cucumber, peeled, seeded and julienned

3 scallions, thinly sliced

1/4 cup crushed roasted peanuts, or more to taste

2 tablespoons chopped cilantro

1 pint jumbo lump crab meat, picked through thoroughly for cartilage and shells

Romain lettuce, to accompany (optional)

Tostadas, homemade or store-bought, or crackers, to accompany (optional)

To Prepare

In a large bowl, combine the lime juice and zest, cayenne pepper, rice wine vinegar and honey. Whisk in the olive oil and season with salt and pepper to taste.

Add the jícama, cucumber, scallions, peanuts and cilantro and toss well to combine. Then, add the crab and gently toss, taking care not to break up the crab meat. Serve over lettuce or in individual cups accompanied by tostadas or crackers.

© 2010-2014 MEXICAN TABLE, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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June 13, 2013
Hearty Bean and Corn Salad with Cilantro Vinaigrette

One of the things that I’m most enthusiastic about in what I do, is breaking down myths about Mexican food and also about Mexicans. One of the biggest misconceptions is that Mexican food is greasy, fatty, cheesy and overloaded in heavy amounts of condiments. Some of the dishes that crossed the Mexican border and have become popular in the US, have been re-interpreted and promoted by the US fast food industry. Yet, mega burrito bombs, nachos smothered in cheese, and sizzling fajitas with scoops of sour cream on top are things you will have a really hard time finding in Mexico.

One thing that surprises people who delve a bit more into the Mexican culinary world is how crazy we are about salads. Not taco salads, no, no, no… Wholesome salads that use vegetables and beans and grains and flowers and all kinds of dried chiles and herbs…

It may be that the Mexican use of the word salad “ensalada” doesn’t help much to spread this good information because we usually call “ensalada” when there is lettuce or leafy greens in it. This leaves out chayote en vinagre, calabacitas en escacheche (pickled zucchini salad), nopalitos, and a gazillion other salads named simply by their main ingredient.

Continue reading Hearty Bean & Corn Salad with Cilantro Vinaigrette


March 5, 2013

“In Pati’s Mexican Table, the first cookbook from Pati Jinich, Jinich is not looking for culinary tourists but converts. Host of the public television series of the same name and official chef of the Mexican Cultural Institute based in Washington, DC, Jinich shares her passion for the Mexican home-style cooking she grew up with in Mexico City…”

To read the entire review, click here.


EVERYDAY GREEN SALAD
Ensalada de todos los dí­as
Serves 6

INGREDIENTS
1 head butter lettuce or red leaf lettuce
1/3 cup white distilled vinegar
1/3 cup vegetable oil
1/3 cup olive oil
1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 garlic clove, minced
1/3 cup red onion, thinly sliced
1 1/2 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt, or to taste
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, or to taste
1/2 teaspoon granulated sugar, or to taste
4 carrots, or 3/4 lb, peeled, thinly sliced
1 large cucumber, or 3/4 lb, peeled, seeded, sliced
2 ripe tomatoes, or 3/4 lb, quartered, seeded, sliced
1 large ripe Mexican avocado, halved, pitted, sliced

TO PREPARE
In a plastic container that has a lid, add the vinegar, vegetable and olive oils, Dijon mustard, garlic, onion, salt, black pepper and sugar. Cover the container with a lid and shake for 10 seconds until the vinaigrette is well emulsified. Alternatively, you can also whisk with a fork in a bowl.

Place the lettuce, carrots, cucumber and tomato in a large salad bowl. Pour a generous amount of the vinaigrette on top and toss. The salad should be coated with the vinaigrette but not swimming in it.

Top with avocado slices, drizzle a bit more vinaigrette on top of and serve.


By adding a few key Mexican ingredients to what you’d normally find in an all-American pantry and fridge, you get these to-die-for, lip-smacking dishes.


CHAYOTE SQUASH AND PICKLED ONION SALAD
Ensalada de chayote y cebolla morada
Serves 6

INGREDIENTS
2 pounds chayote squash
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
3 tablespoons olive oil
3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt, or to taste
1/4 teaspoon sugar, or to taste
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, or to taste
1/4 teaspoon dried oregano or 1 teaspoon fresh oregano
1/2 cup red onion, thinly sliced

TO PREPARE
Place unpeeled chayotes in a saucepan, cover with water, bring to a boil and cover the pan, then reduce heat to low; simmer for 25 to 30 minutes until the chayotes are cooked through. A knife will cleanly go through them, but they won’t be completely soft or mushy.

Drain, and once cool, peel the chayotes. Cut them in half, then slice into sticks.

Combine the remaining ingredients, except for the onions, and whisk into a vinaigrette. Add the onions, mix well and let it sit for 5 to 10 minutes. It can also be made ahead a day before and left in the refrigerator.

Toss the chayote sticks with the vinaigrette and onions. Serve or cover and refrigerate for up to 12 hours.


Simple, easy, home-style cuisine that you’d find in just about any Mexican home, recreated for the American kitchen. This meal was my favorite “everyday” meal growing up in Mexico, and one I regularly make for my own family today. I am proud to share the steps so that you can enjoy it too.


April 5, 2012

A couple weeks ago, right as I was setting up for one of my classes, “A Culinary Compass of Mexico,” at the Mexican Cultural Institute, Alberto Roblest came over and asked me a great question.

“Pati, do you cook traditional Mexican recipes OR do you create your own?”

Alberto is doing a project with the support of The Office on Latino Affairs. It is called Hola Cultura and explores the contributions of Latinos to DC life and culture, from art to language to sports to cooking.

I think he meant for me to respond with an either or. He really did. Come on Pati, “traditional” OR “new,” he insisted. But I kept answering “BOTH!” As I kept trying to explain why, I realized so wholeheartedly that both traditional and new not only describe my cooking style but also one of the many wonders of Mexican cuisine.

Continue reading Apple, Radish, Watercress Salad with Pistachio and Chile de Arbol

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