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Salsa


Fish over Fennel Salad with a Jalapeno and Olive Salsa

Fish over Fennel Salad with Jalapeño and Olive Salsa
Pescado con Ensalada de Eneldo y Salsa de Jalapeño y Aceitunas

Serves: 4

Pescado con Ensalada de Eneldo y Salsa de Jalapeño y Aceitunas" alt="Fish over Fennel Salad with Jalapeño and Olive Salsa
Pescado con Ensalada de Eneldo y Salsa de Jalapeño y Aceitunas" />

Ingredients

For the fennel salad:

2 tablespoons pumpkin seeds

1 fennel bulb, thinly sliced

1/4 cup thinly sliced red onion (about 1/4 of a red onion)

2 oranges, peeled and thinly sliced or cut into segments, plus juice

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

Kosher or coarse sea salt, to taste

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste


For the olive salsa:

1/4 cup golden raisins

1 tablespoon tequila

1/4 cup chopped pitted black Italian olives in brine

1 jalapeño chile, thinly sliced

1/4 cup fresh cilantro, leaves and upper stems, chopped

1/4 cup fresh parsley, leaves and upper stems, chopped

Freshly squeezed juice of 2 limes

2 tablespoons olive oil

Kosher or coarse sea salt, to taste

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste


For the fish:

1/2 cup all-purpose flour

Kosher or coarse sea salt, to taste

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

4 6-ounce red snapper fillets, or any mild fish of your choice, such as tilapia, rockfish or grouper

3 tablespoons olive oil

To Prepare

To prepare the salad: To toast the pumpkin seeds, place them in an already hot, small sauté pan set over low heat. Stir often, being careful that they don’t burn, until you start to hear popping sounds (similar to popcorn), and they begin to turn from green to a toasty brown, about 4 to 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and place in a bowl.

Combine fennel, red onion, orange segments and juice in a mixing bowl. Add the olive oil, balsamic vinegar, salt and pepper. Toss to combine. Add the toasted pumpkin seeds. Toss once more and wait to serve with the fish.

To prepare the salsa: Place the golden raisins in a medium mixing bowl and pour the tequila over the raisins. Allow the raisins to plump up in the tequila for a few minutes while prepping the remaining ingredients. Then add the olives, jalapeño, cilantro, parsley, lime juice, olive oil, salt and pepper to the bowl with the raisins and tequila. Combine well and serve with the fish.

To prepare the fish: Combine the flour, a pinch salt and a pinch pepper on a flat plate and spread. Using a small knife, score each fish filet, cutting 3 shallow horizontal lines into the skin of each fillet – do not cut through the fillets. Dust the fillets on each side with a thin layer of the flour mixture.

Heat the oil in a skillet over medium heat. When oil is hot and ready (test by dipping a piece of the fish to see if it happily bubbles), place the fillets in the pan skin-side down. Cook until the skin is crisped and lightly browned, about 3 minutes. If at any point the fish begins to curl, use a spatula to press the fish firmly down in the pan. Flip with a spatula or tongs and cook on the other side until done, about another 4 minutes. Transfer the fish to a plate covered in paper towels to drain. Serve on top of the fennel salad and with the salsa on the side.

© 2010-2014 MEXICAN TABLE, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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Drunken Salsa

Drunken Pasilla, Prune and Orange Salsa
Salsa Borracha de Pasilla, Ciruela y Naranja

Serves: makes about 3 cups salsa

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Salsa Borracha de Pasilla, Ciruela y Naranja" />

Ingredients

6 to 8 pasilla chiles (about 2 ounces), stemmed and seeded

2 garlic cloves with husks on

1 cup boiling water

1 cup beer

1 cup freshly squeezed orange juice

1 1/2 cups pitted prunes

1 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt

To Prepare

Set a skillet or comal over medium heat and, once hot, toast the chiles for about 1 minute per side, being careful not to burn them. Remove from heat.

Roast, or char, the garlic cloves for about 6 to 8 minutes either on the same skillet or comal, or under a broiler for 3 to 4 minutes. Set aside and peel away the husks once the cloves have cooled.

Place the toasted chiles in a medium saucepan and cover with the boiling water, beer and orange juice. Add the prunes to the pan and simmer for 8 to 10 minutes. Put the chiles, prunes and cooking liquid into a blender, along with the garlic and salt. Puree until smooth and serve.

© 2010-2014 MEXICAN TABLE, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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January 9, 2014
Chicken Tamales with Salsa Verde

Tamales are it. If you’ve eaten one, you know it.

Simple. When ready and steaming hot, unwrap the edible bundle and eat swiftly, no fork, no knife, bite by bite.  So good.

Yet as simple as it may sound to write a post about tamales, I could dedicate an entire series of cookbooks to their endless possibilities, and in the end, not have covered them all.

Ancestral, iconic, yet humble, is each single tamal. And the tamal universe, immense, imagine: tamal refers to anything wrapped and cooked in a husk or leave. Usually made with masa, typically corn masa, either mixed with or swaddling ingredients, or both! As you move through Mexico, and increasingly outside, you find them in different shapes (round, square, flat, puffed up, even triangular like Michoacán corundas); with different wraps (corn husks, either fresh or dried, banana leaves and even fresh edible leafy greens like chaya in Chiapas); with an infinity of ingredients, from savory, like chicken, meat, seafood, vegetables, beans, all sort of grains, salsas and cheese…to sweet ingredients, like fresh and dried fruits, nuts, chocolate, cajeta

The consistency and texture vary greatly, too, from thin and dense like tamales found in Oaxaca; to sticky and gelatinous from Yucatán; to spongy and cakey like the ones from northern and central Mexico, where I grew up.

Continue reading My Favorite Tamal of All Time: Chicken in Green Salsa


Salsa Verde Cruda with Avocado

Salsa Verde Cruda with AvocadoSalsa Verde Cruda con Aguacate

Serves: makes about 2 cups salsa

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Ingredients

1 pound tomatillos, husks removed, rinsed and halved

1 ripe avocado, halved, pitted, meat scooped out

2 tablespoons coarsely chopped white onion

1/4 cup coarsely chopped cilantro leaves and top part of stems

1 jalapeño or serrano chile

3/4 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt, or to taste

To Prepare

Combine the tomatillos, avocado, onion, cilantro, chile (you can add half of the chile first, and add more if you want more heat…) and salt in a blender or food processor. Puree until smooth.

© 2010-2014 MEXICAN TABLE, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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Pico de Gallo

Pico de Gallo SalsaPico de Gallo

Serves: makes about 4 cups

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Ingredients

1 pound ripe tomatoes, cored and chopped (about 3 cups)

1/2 cup finely chopped white onion

1 jalapeño or serrano chile, finely chopped, or to taste

1/2 cup coarsely chopped cilantro leaves and top part of stems, or to taste

2 to 3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice, or to taste

2 tablespoons olive oil (optional)

1 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt, or to taste

To Prepare

Place the tomatoes, onion, chile, cilantro, lime juice, olive oil (if using) and salt in a bowl and toss well. Let it sit for at least 5 minutes before serving. Store any leftovers, covered, in the refrigerator.

© 2010-2014 MEXICAN TABLE, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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September 7, 2013

I talk to Evan Kleiman, host of KCRW‘s “Good Food,” about salsas! Which one is my favorite? Listen in…

For my Huevos Divorciados recipe, click here.

Continue reading
KCRW: Good Food

COMMENTS (2)


June 24, 2013

On my recent trip to Mexico, I visited the carnitas capital of the world – Quiroga, Michoacán! So, of course, this time on ABC‘s The Chew, I had to share my perfected recipe for carnitas. I made Carnitas Tacos with Daphne Oz, and we mixed up some Salsa Verde Cruda to top them.

Watch the segment on the Carnitas Tacos…

Watch the segment on the Salsa Verde Cruda…

For the recipe, click here.


ADOBO FISH TACOS WITH GRILLED PINEAPPLE SALSA
Tacos de pescado adobado con salsa de piña
Serves 6

INGREDIENTS
2 oz or 3 ancho chiles, rinsed, stemmed and seeded
1/2 cup white onion, coarsely-chopped
2 garlic cloves, peeled
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1/2 cup apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon brown sugar
3/4 teaspoon kosher or sea salt
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 pound of mild and firm fish fillets like snapper, striped bass, rock fish, snook or tilapia
4 pineapple slices
1 jalapeño or serrano chile, chopped, or to taste
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro
1 tablespoon freshly-squeezed lime juice, or to taste
1 tablespoon olive oil
Kosher or coarse sea salt, to taste
Corn tortillas

TO PREPARE
To make the Adobo Sauce:
Cover the chiles with boiling hot water and let them soak for 10 minutes. Pace the chiles along with 1/2 cup of soaking liquid, onion, garlic, oregano, vinegar, sugar and salt in the blender. Purée until smooth.

In a saucepan set over medium heat, heat the oil. Once hot, pour the sauce into the oil; cover the saucepan, leaving it slightly open, and let the sauce season and thicken for 6 to 8 minutes, stirring here and there. Remove from the heat.

To make the Fish:
Baste the fish fillets with the adobo sauce; you may refrigerate them and let them marinate for up to 24 hours.

In a large skillet coated with oil and set over medium-high heat, cook the fish for about 3 to 4 minutes per side.

To make the Salsa:
Heat a grill pan, a grill or a nonstick skillet over medium heat until hot and lightly coat with safflower or corn oil. Cook the pineapple slices for about 4 minutes per side until they are slightly charred. Remove from the heat, once cool enough to handle cut into bite-size chunks. Place in a mixing bowl and toss with the cilantro, chile, lime juice, oil and salt to taste.

To assemble Tacos:
Place the warm tortillas, the pineapple salsa and the fish on the table, then assemble the tacos!


This episode explores three very different, very authentic and very simple twists on Mexican tacos, one of Mexico’s most iconic foods.


October 25, 2011

You can do fabulous things with pumpkins aside from spooky faces and pumpkin pie… Just ask any Mexican. We have a way with pumpkins.

Native to Mexico, pumpkins have been devoured there for centuries, in their entirety. The seeds are addicting as snacks, used as a hefty base for salsas, soups and sauces and more recently sprinkled on top of many dishes. The pumpkin meat is used for soups and stews, and along with the entire rind cooked in a piloncillo syrup, becoming a traditional favorite known as Tacha.

Yet there is something else you can make with those fall pumpkins: Mole!

An easy to make, silky textured and exquisite tasting mole sauce, that can bathe anything you can think of. From chicken to meat, fish, seafood and veggies; it all goes beautifully swaddled in it. I like it mostly with chicken or turkey, which is how I am most used to eating thick and rich Mole sauces….

So that you can try it too, here it goes.

Continue reading Pumpkin and Ancho Chile Mole

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