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Yucatan


February 28, 2014
Yucatán Style French Toast

It’s ironic. The farthest away from Mexico I’ve been, the closest I’ve felt to my home country and the more I’ve gotten to know it.

Namely, there are 2,419 miles between my home in the DC area and the home I was born and raised in, in Mexico City (I’ve seen it in Google maps a thousand times with my boys), it’s a 44-hour drive if you go non-stop and a 5-hour flight with no connections.

Distance matters. It weighs, in tons of pounds of nostalgia that can be soothed in the kitchen. Distance has made my time in Mexico intense and adventurous, and the foods I am able to replicate in my American kitchen that much more precious.

Continue reading Yucatán Style French Toast: Ultra Decadent


January 17, 2014

9 OCTOBER 2014
6:45 PM to 9:00 PM

Cooking demonstration and tasting dinner at the Mexican Cultural Institute in Washington, DC.

Come experience the regional flavors of the Yucatán, Mexico’s culinary outlier, with me and a very special guest chef from the Yucatán.

To register and for more information, click here.


December 25, 2009
Pickled Red Onions

As promised, and right before the year ends, here is a recipe for pickled red onions or cebollas encurtidas or en escabeche, so you can try them with Pollo Pibil. Please do! You will see why it’s no wonder pickled red onion has been Pibil’s faithful and enlightened companion for centuries: they both taste great separately, but blissful when paired together.

Pickled red onions are also a permanent fixture at every single table in Yucatan. As they are mildly spicy, deliciously tangy and surprisingly crunchy they go well with so many things. These past couple weeks I learned first hand why they are such a fabulous pickle to have handy.

Since one of its main ingredients, the bitter orange, is hard to come by around here, I had 16 takes with different bitter orange substitutes. There are well-known versions for substitutes, but I am not crazy about any of them. 16 pickled red onion batches later: I found one I love! It is equal parts grapefruit, orange, lime juice and white distilled vinegar. Without the vinegar it’s not acid enough and the pickle loses its color and crunch, it faints quickly.

Continue reading Pickled Red Onions a la Yucateca


December 18, 2009
pollo pibil

Last December, Daniel and I went to Yucatán. I was swept off my feet by the grandiose nature and history of the old Haciendas, but mostly by the uniqueness of the cuisine. It stands out from the rest of the country; with its aromatic, pungent, citrus flavors, charred and toasted ingredients and elements not found anywhere else.

Since at the Institute we established topics for the 2009 program in January and I left Yucatán as a December closing session, by the time class came around I was desperate to share these flavors. What a tortuous self imposed wait!

Of course Pollo Pibil had to be included, as it is one of the most loved dishes of the area. The rest of the menu was built around: Dzotobi-chay tamales, avocado soup, strained beans, a yellow rice, and old fashioned flan for dessert.

Continue reading Pollo Pibil

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Pollo Pibil

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December 18, 2009
Achiote 1-thumb-510x342-566

Achiote or Annatto seeds is a spice that grows heavily in the Yucatán area and is unique and native to this area. The seeds come from the Annatto tree, which grows beautiful pink flowers that produce a prickly pod which has dozens and dozens of these seeds inside.

The seeds have a beautiful brown, brick, reddish warm and appealing color. The Mayas used the seeds since Pre-Hispanic times to color their skin, garments, art and they also mixed them with their chocolate drink as a symbol of blood, given the color, in their rites. The seeds provide a strong, pungent and sort of permanent flavor to the dishes they are used in.



December 16, 2009
Achiote Paste-thumb-510x342-651

The achiote paste or recado rojo, is one of the main seasonings of the Yucatecan cuisine. Although it is mainly known for its use as the base of a marinade in the Pibil style dishes, it is used in many other ways.

This paste is made of achiote seeds, charred garlic, toasted herbs and spices such as oregano, cloves, cumin, black peppercorns, allspice, coriander seeds, salt and bitter orange or its substitute, which is a mix of citrus juices and/or vinegar.

Continue reading Achiote Paste or Recado Rojo


December 10, 2009

10 DECEMBER 2009
6:30 to 9:00 PM

Cooking demonstration and tasting dinner at the Mexican Cultural Institute.
(registration deadline: December 3)

The cuisine from Yucatan differs from the rest of the country. The Mayas, who inhabit the region, have had a unique indigenous cuisine to start with. In Colonial times, the Maya cuisine mixed with that of the European settlers, creating the traditional Yucatecan food. It is absolutely scrumptious!

It was mainly in the kitchens of the Haciendas, which were once main production centers and grandiose households, where this culinary intermarriage blossomed. These days, some haciendas have been turned into luxurious hotels with restaurants that serve loved traditional dishes as well as some new spins.

Join us for a Rediscovery of the Yucatan Haciendas. Enjoy an entertaining demo and a full menu of Yucatan cuisine and music. After class, you will leave with a packet of recipes and some ingredients to recreate some of these dishes in your own kitchen.

Click here to register for this event.


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