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July 3, 2014

“Ancho chili burgers with lime aioli: The flavors of Mexico spice up this new classic from ‘Pati’s Mexican Table’ star Pati Jinich…”

To view the slideshow, click here.


June 28, 2014

“During the American Library Association’s annual meeting this weekend in Las Vegas, Nevada, over 180 notable Latino authors will be gathering for the 16th annual International Latino Book Awards (ILBA). Saturday night’s event will announce the best Latino books in 87 categories in a year that has seen the submissions increase dramatically, which does not surprise one of the award’s co-founders…

…This year’s 231 honorees include Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, and celebrities like TV chef Pati Jinich, the late singer and actress Jenni Rivera, singer Linda Ronstadt, screenwriter Rick Najera, and TV personality Lilliana Vasquez. Winners come from across the U.S. and from 18 other countries…”

To read the entire article, click here.


June 19, 2014

“The Imagen Foundation has announced the nominees for the 29th Annual Imagen (Spanish for ‘image’) Awards, honoring portrayals of Latinos and Latino cultures in television and film.” The third season of Pati’s Mexican Table has been nominated in the Best National Informational Program category along with Oprah’s Next Chapter, LatiNation, Latino Americans, and mun2 News Special.

To see the full list of nominees, click here.


June 3, 2014

“The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History announces the formation of the Kitchen Cabinet, an advisory board made up of leaders in food scholarship, culinary history and food-related businesses in America to help the museum shape and expand its research, collections, programs and exhibitions related to food and beverage history. The inaugural meeting of the Kitchen Cabinet took place on April 30.

The museum, as part of its American Food History Project, has formed the Kitchen Cabinet to assist staff to expand its thinking, grow its audiences and take a new approach to telling the story of American history through food…”

To read the entire article, click here.



April 11, 2014

“A few months ago, I was channel surfing on TV, and landed on an intriguing show on PBS called Pati’s Mexican Table. Not a lover of food shows by any stretch of the imagination, I found myself somehow riveted to the screen. Pati Jinich was the chef, preparing in an effortless and jubilant way what looked to be a sumptuous authentic Mexican dish for her young son. I remember there were prawns in the dish, and the food looked so inviting. Her small boy was enraptured, gobbling it down for dinner. While I certainly know TV is not real life, I was struck by Pati – by the sheer joy and love she shared about Mexican food, culture and tradition. It was palpable and jumped off the screen, and made me want to record every show, to learn how to cook authentic Mexican dishes and adore the process, just as she did.

To my surprise, shortly after, I was able to connect with Pati about her new book by the same title, Pati’s Mexican Table, and I had the opportunity to speak at length with her about her fascinating journey from Mexico, to Washington as a political analyst, to serving as a top Mexican chef with her own popular PBS show focused on Mexican food and heritage…”

To read the entire article, click here.


March 24, 2014

“Mexican food has suffered an image problem. When people say they want Mexican food they think fajitas, or hard shell tacos, or chile con queso. These ‘Tex Mex’ fast food interpretations discredit a cuisine that has arose from ancient civilizations that pre-date the arrival of the Spaniards.

And that is precisely why we need someone like Pati Jinich, the Latin American policy-researcher-turned-chef who is transforming our view of Mexican cuisine.

Her exploration of her own culinary heritage in Mexico is part of a growing field of public diplomacy – gastrodiplomacy…”

To read the entire article, click here.


March 4, 2014

“You don’t expect a celebrity chef to invite you to her home and serve you ‘piggy cookies.’ (She did. For me!) You don’t expect a celebrity chef to have a Master’s degree in Latin American Studies from Georgetown (she does). In fact, just eight years ago, Pati left her full-time job as a political analyst to pursue her love of Mexican food and the culture of her home country. On her hit show, Pati’s Mexican Table on PBS, you’ll often get a mini-history lesson on a region of Mexico, or the geneses of certain ingredients. She recently wrote an article for The Washington Post about the origins of Tex-Mex food, to which my Mexican American friend from Texas proclaimed should be taught in every school in America…”

To read the entire article, click here.


February 18, 2014

“The International Association of Culinary Professionals has announced the 2014 IACP Award Finalists, all of which are listed below…” Pati’s Mexican Table has been nominated for “Best Series”!

To read the entire article, click here.


January 28, 2014

“It was 1997, and I was excited. A year after moving to Dallas from Mexico City, where I was born and raised, I would finally have the chance to get what Tex-Mex cooking was all about. I was visiting San Antonio, the capital of Tex-Mex, at one of its most famous Tex-Mex restaurants. And then the food came.

The large, oval combo platter in front of me was supposed to be cheese enchiladas with red rice and refried beans, but all I could see was a thick blanket of cream-colored sauce with melted, yellow processed cheese on top, threatening to spill over the plate and possibly even out of the restaurant. I couldn’t tell whether the tortillas were corn or flour, and they were barely filled; the mealy red rice had a watered-down tomato taste and an overdose of cumin; the refried beans were runny and — oh, heresy! — there weren’t enough of them to eat along with each bite. I was hungry, and curious, so I ate it all. In a strange way, it was comforting, but I was perplexed. After I finished, I told the Mexican waiter: No entiendo lo que me acabo de comer. I don’t get what I just ate.

I still think about that meal because it is emblematic of the problems people have with Tex-Mex. Mexican food purists take swipes at it, claiming it is simply bad Americanized Mexican food, while Texans rush to defend it as its own breed…”

To read the entire article, click here.


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